1.       Enthusiasm, irony, ambivalence: Armando’s aesthetic negotiation of ‘The War’ in The Netherlands.pdf

Written as MA dissertation for "Global Conceptualism: The Last Avant-garde or a New Beginning?" taught by Professor Sarah Wilson at the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2014-2015

Armando,  De Ladder , 1994

Armando, De Ladder, 1994

This dissertation assesses the attempts of Dutch national hero Armando, who turned eighty-five in 2015, to artistically negotiate his childhood experiences and memories of the occupation of The Netherlands by the Nazi’s during the Second World War. It critically situates the artist in the post-war European artistic context in light of his engagement with the work of the international avant-gardes of the 1950s and 60s, in particular those of French informel, Nouveau Réalime and German Zero. It examines how the artist developed out of the first two decades of his career into the 1970s, when a turn away from group collaborations and towards the themes of historical Romanticism came to define his practice. Demonstrated is how Armando’s Romantic desire, in particular its oscillation between enthusiasm and irony, allowed him to combine formal and stylistic elements from his early career to suit his personal themes and artistic needs: the negotiation of the specifically Dutch experience of the Second World War. The text argues that Armando's work not only succeeded in negotiating his own traumatic memories of war, but equally assumed a political significance for shaping Dutch viewing, thinking and remembering the legacy of 'The War'.


Amikam Toren,  Neither a Teapot nor a Painting,  1979

Amikam Toren, Neither a Teapot nor a Painting, 1979

Written for the MA "Global Conceptualism: The Last Avant-garde or a New Beginning?" taught by Professor Sarah Wilson at the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2014-2015

This essay takes on the history of so-called ‘Romantic Conceptualism’ as a way to see, feel and resituate the work of Amikam Toren (b. 1945). Using Friedrich Schlegel’s Romantic dialectics in combination with the dominant narratives of analytical conceptual art - which argued against ‘expressive’ material qualities - as a counterpoint, it critically examines how Toren’s engagement with tactile materiality has underpinned his conceptual exploration of the expansion of meaning, the relationship between image and text, the themes of presence and absence, the sensuality and ‘thingness’ of objects and their uncanny potency.


3.    Representing Los Desaparecidos: Absence, Violence, Reclamation.pdf

Luis Camnitzer,  He Feared Thirst,  from the  Uruguayan Toruture Series,  1982

Luis Camnitzer, He Feared Thirst, from the Uruguayan Toruture Series, 1982

Written for the MA "Global Conceptualism: The Last Avant-garde or a New Beginning?" taught by Professor Sarah Wilson at the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2014-2015

This essay addresses the ‘disappeared’ of Central and South America and the commemorative touring exhibition Los Desaparecidos/The Disappeared of 2007-2008. Using Lyotard’s le différend on absence and erasure and Jacques Rancière’s concepts of politics and aesthetics, works examined include those of Sara Maniero, Arturo Duclos, Oscar Munoz and Luis Camnitzer, with particular attention for the latter's Uruguayan Torture Series, 1982.


Anri Sala,  1395 Days of Red,  2011

Anri Sala, 1395 Days of Red, 2011

Designed and written for the MA "Global Conceptualism: The Last Avant-garde or a New Beginning?" taught by Professor Sarah Wilson at the Courtauld Institute of Art, 2014-2015

A virtual exhibition, proposed to take place at the Institute for International Visual Arts (InIVA), Shoreditch, London.